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About Varied / Professional Member Mitchell Van DuzerMale/United States Group :iconabscondiverse: Abscondiverse
 
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Sarafina Herself by iancjw
by iancjw

I disagree with Promethicon and Elder-Sun about the face. I think the ambiguity lends an atmosphere of mystique to the painting which i...

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16153AecECf100474D [Circuits] by CheVD
16153AecECf100474D [Circuits]
16153AecECf100474D [Circuits] (2014)
acrylic on wood panel, 6" x 6"

There's no huge concept behind this painting-- it's pretty much purely decorative. Last week I walked into my local art supply store, and I noticed they're accepting 6" x 6" pieces for a month-long community show. I figured it'd be a good opportunity to show off something in this town, and it also turned out to be an opportunity to experiment with some new iridescent paints. I wanted to do something still in the vein of the majority of my serious fine artwork, the bulk of which is themed around technology-- but for the purposes of this show, I figured it could be more about aesthetics than concept. So I did a circuitry design. I'm quite happy with how it turned out. Plus, I'll be getting a voucher at the store for participating.
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Shrike Rust by CheVD
Shrike Rust
Shrike Rust (Study in Entropic Mimesis) (2014)
acrylic on wood panel, 14" x 14"

This was an interesting painting to produce. I can't recall the last time the process for one of my artworks involved as much destruction as creation. This one certainly did-- deliberately putting pockmarks in the surface with a wrench and a hammer, sanding off the paint in between layering it on. I'm not sure if the photograph really does it justice, because those scars and abrasions are just as important as the colors themselves.

Ever since the days of Marcel Duchamp's Readymades, I think artists have had a unique fascination with the notion that there's some delineation between "art" and "not art". My understanding thus far was always that art is informed by intent-- the product of a willful intellect. As a self-interested artist, my philosophy has been that, regardless of the viewer's perspective, something is "art" when it demonstrates the presence of conscious effort on the part of an artist: a sunset isn't art, but a photograph or painting of one is; a snow shovel or unintelligible splatters of paint on a canvas or erotic photography can be art, if an artist makes the conscious effort to contextualize it as such. But in the process of creating this piece, I realized there's a blind spot in that philosophy, because on some level, it means that art inherently implies artifice. The simulacra hanging in the gallery is art, but the real thing in the real world is not. And that means that there are some things which artists can inherently never realize.

Take decay, for example. Decay is a real governing principle of natural life-- one which, I'll admit, sort of scares me because my artwork and I are just as subject to it as everyone and everything else. Entropy rots the organic and grinds down the inorganic. An artist like Robert Smithson can understand entropy, and build it into his practice, and take credit for it-- but its mechanics are ultimately not within our limited realm of control. Other factors are involved-- time, gravity, pressure, temperature, the elements, the intervention of other living beings, human or not, for which "aesthetic impact" may not be a consideration. There is a fundamental difference between an item that has been damaged through natural wear or neglect, and an item that has been damaged because some self-important idiot deliberately took a wrench and sandpaper to it in the name of "art"-- the former is real, and the latter is an illusion.

So I'm an illusionist. And confronted with the revelation that what I do is tantamount to magic tricks involving static two-dimensional surfaces instead of playing cards and impossible escapes-- the only reaction that makes logical sense to me as someone interested in art as a vehicle of personal growth is to be less concerned about how "real" the tricks seem to the audience, and more interested in how close to real they actually are. I understand that's a pretty subtle distinction, but take it from me-- the subject of entropy haunts a really dark corner of my psyche. It's pretty sobering to be saddled with a memento mori that won't go away-- not just for my mind and body and soul, but for my entire life's impact. None of it can possibly last forever. If I'm supposed to be some sort of intellectual magician, then this is me performing a trick in actual defiance of death.
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altar by CheVD
altar
Second new painting in the span of a few weeks, which (considering the lengthy drought of work before I moved) is very encouraging. I think it really helps that I finally have dedicated studio space now. And I think the long hiatus from painting has allowed me to reconsider my perspective on how I approach work. I decided I wanted to experiment with creating something that was much more than it appeared on the surface. I'm a big fan of puzzles, and always have been since I was a kid. I've hidden subtle things in paintings before, but I don't think that has ever been as central to the concept of any of my fine art as it was to this one.

I'm still working with technology as subject matter, because I still believe it's one of the most central themes to Western life in the 21st Century. As far as the neon aesthetic-- well, I have to admit, that was most consciously influenced by having bought a copy of Shadow the Hedgehog recently. XD Particularly from playing the cyberspace levels, the ones which were themselves pretty much jacked from Tron. I envisioned the canvas as partitioned into different colored sections of light circuits-- red, green, blue, yellow, cyan, magenta, and white. I like the fluorescent circuit effect-- I think I might dabble a bit more with it some time.
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Hey everybody! Today, I'm sorta doing the signal-boosting thing. My friend Genisay is in a bit of a bind at the moment-- some financial troubles. She's not even sure she'll be able to afford groceries this week.

I know a lot of you guys are in a similar position, not having a whole lot of money-- but please, if you can spare it, check out her page here and consider requesting a commission from her. She does really fantastic work, as you can see from the commissions I've received from her.

Steel Beneath Pine by Genisay       Vina Levitate by Genisay

Granted, both of these were more complex than the commissions she can afford to produce right now... but it's still definitely worth it, if you've got a couple of dollars to spare. And if you can't contribute any money, please at least consider signal-boosting her on your journal as well. ^_^;;

Thanks, everyone!
I/O by CheVD
I/O
I/O (2014)
acrylic on canvas, 14" x 11"

At this point in my artistic practice, I'm quite fed up with pretentious, overly convoluted conceptual postmodernist bullshit-- the contrived stuff that references Baudrillard and Deleuze, and rationalizes the application of pigment to stretched canvas in exaggeratedly pedantic terms. I'm not exactly sure what has triggered this antagonism-- maybe it has something to do with moving back to small-town USA after six years in the heart of Vancouver. Bellingham seems so much more earnest and down-to-earth, and less concerned with appearances. Reading through a lot of the literature I picked up from visiting Vancouver's galleries over the years, I see the pretense everywhere. Maybe this is one reason artists tend to have a rough time in an economy like this, and why our consumer base is generally comprised of the rich. There's a distinct snobbishness and ego to what we do which disconnects us from everyone else. No gallery presents the public with unjustified artwork-- it's bad for business. They think (perhaps rightly) that it's impossible to sell art if they tell prospective customers that the artist honestly had no idea what the hell they were doing. So they frame the work in impenetrable prosaic nonsense, and so many of us artists, we go along with it because we like to come off as intellectuals too. I'm as guilty of it as any of my colleagues.

Claiming there was any other motivation behind this painting aside from wanting to paint, and wanting to break in my new personal studio, though, would be intellectually dishonest. I had no lofty concepts, no planning, no forethought whatsoever. It's just off-the-cuff painting, damn it. And it exists now. Always having to defend or justify why it exists is stupid, and it shouldn't be a requisite for having an intellect or an innate drive to create.

And the title? I suspect I came up with that the way a lot of other rationalization is developed-- after the fact, completely detached from the process, made up on the spot like an afterthought or a lie-- the difference being, most of the time, the artist is supposed to stick to the lie and not admit it's a lie, at least until it becomes the truth. I needed a title, and I/O just seemed to fit. I mean, looking at what I'd just done, there seemed like there was a duality to it, and I've been doing technology-themed work for a long time now. I sat down at my computer to think about the title, and I noticed I'd subconsciously borrowed the pink and mint green from the microphone and speaker jacks. Input/output. I take in the world around me, and it comes out something like this. 
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Hey everybody! Today, I'm sorta doing the signal-boosting thing. My friend Genisay is in a bit of a bind at the moment-- some financial troubles. She's not even sure she'll be able to afford groceries this week.

I know a lot of you guys are in a similar position, not having a whole lot of money-- but please, if you can spare it, check out her page here and consider requesting a commission from her. She does really fantastic work, as you can see from the commissions I've received from her.

Steel Beneath Pine by Genisay       Vina Levitate by Genisay

Granted, both of these were more complex than the commissions she can afford to produce right now... but it's still definitely worth it, if you've got a couple of dollars to spare. And if you can't contribute any money, please at least consider signal-boosting her on your journal as well. ^_^;;

Thanks, everyone!

deviantID

CheVD
Mitchell Van Duzer
Artist | Professional | Varied
United States
AKA: Che
Current Residence: Bellingham, Washington / Bradenton, Florida
Graduate, Emily Carr University of Art and Design (2010)
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:icontoranekohybrid:
toranekohybrid Featured By Owner Feb 14, 2014
Happy V day peeples by toranekohybrid
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:icondettythecat:
DettyTheCat Featured By Owner Jul 8, 2013
Look [link]
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:iconlitfuse55:
litfuse55 Featured By Owner May 7, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
That you are an HTF fan...and then your politics...you get a watch...
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:icone-47:
E-47 Featured By Owner May 7, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
you should ask for one of these cakes in your next birthday ;P
[link]
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:icone-47:
E-47 Featured By Owner Mar 25, 2013  Hobbyist General Artist
heres a gift my friend [link]
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:iconjakidothefox:
JakidoTheFox Featured By Owner Mar 2, 2013
Can you watch me?
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:iconmarnodor:
Marnodor Featured By Owner Feb 18, 2013  Hobbyist Digital Artist
Oh man you're alive after all D:
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:iconviscious-speed:
Viscious-Speed Featured By Owner Feb 9, 2013   General Artist
Thanks for the faves!
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RHODOL1TE Featured By Owner Dec 24, 2012  Student General Artist
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SanyaWaffles Featured By Owner Dec 9, 2012
*Plays happy birthday on a tuba*
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